Friday, 3 January 2014


Framing the Psalms  Psalm 2         

Psalm 2  John Cumming

In this Psalm, from verses 1 to 4, are set forth the united efforts
of Jew and Gentile, seconded by regal power, to crush the kingdom of Christ ; and from verses 4 to 6, the utter helplessness and folly of such impious conspiracies. God the Father, in verse 6, declares his having installed Christ the prince of the kings of the earth; and, in verse 7, Christ makes known the words of the Father in raising him from the dead, Acts xiii. 33. In verse 8, the extent and efficacy of the intercession of Jesus are stated ; and, in the remaining part of the Psalm, kings and magistrates are exhorted to the observance of the duty that devolves on them as Christian rulers viz., to protect, support, and patronize the church of Christ, and to use every lawful expedient to glorify God, and to promote the salvation of sinners.

Let us sing the Psalm rejoicing that the gospel will assuredly triumph over the malice and the opposition of sinners, and thankful that our kings have read and endeavoured to obey the solemn warning - seeing Christianity is established and countenanced by " the powers that be ; " and, at the same time, let us pray that all the kings of the earth may become " nursing fathers " to the church, and that in our hearts and lives, individually, we may feel the savour and the power of the truth as it is in Christ.

Psalm 2  John Brown

Perhaps this psalm relates partly to David's instalment on his throne, and the victories over his enemies which attended it. Compare Psalm 18; 2 Samuel 3, 5, 8, 10, 18, 20. But the whole of it respects Jesus our Redeemer. Behold, (1.) The violent and harmonious, but unsuccessful opposition, which Jews and Gentiles of all ranks make to the person and redemption work of the great God my Saviour. Behold what ruin and woe they draw upon themselves by their attempts! ver. 1-5, 9. (2.) Behold how, notwithstanding all their raging malice and furious opposition, Jehovah installs our Redeemer King in his church, and infallibly fixes him on his throne; avows him his only begotten Son, and gives unto him the Gentiles for his people! ver. 6-8. (3.) Behold Jehovah's demand of serious consideration and fear of, joy in, and trust, obedience and love to his exalted Son, ver. 9-12.

While I sing, let me remark the horrid nature of sin; let me with broken heart, bewail my neglect of, and opposition to Jesus Christ. Let me with wonder bless his name, that I have not already perished in mine iniquity. Let me with earnestness accept that once debased Redeemer, as my Saviour, my sovereign, my proprietor, my God, my all. Let me learn to know him, rejoice in him, and with holy awe, commit my whole salvation, and the salvation of my country, nay, of all the ends of the earth to him.

Psalm 2  William Horne ( 18th century High Anglican)

ARGUMENT. — David, seated upon the throne of Israel, notwithstanding the opposition made against him, and now about to carry his victorious arms amongst the neighbouring heathen nations, may be supposed to have penned this, as a kind of inauguration Psalm. But that "a greater than David is here," appears not only from the strength of the expressions, which are more properly applicable to Messiah, than to David himself ; but also from the citations made in the New Testament; the appointment of the Psalm by the church to be read on Easter-day ; and the confessions of the Jewish rabbis.


It treats therefore, 1 — 3. Of the opposition raised, both by Jew and Gentile, against the kingdom of Jesus Christ ; 4 — 6. Of his victory, and the confusion of his enemies ; 7 — 9. After his resurrection, he preaches the Gospel ; and, 10 — 12. Calls the kings of the earth to accept it ; denouncing vengeance against those who shall not do so, and pronouncing a blessing on those who shall.